Botswana: 28 things to know before you go on an independent Botswana Camping Safari

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28 Things you Absolutely need to know before you go on a camping safari in Botswana

If you dream about or are planning a Botswana camping safari adventure, you are at the right place.

Remote…Isolated…Wild – this is Botswana camping safari!  The best way to experience the country’s landscape and wildlife is by driving and wild camping in the remote safaris of Botswana.

There is no question that the best way to explore Botswana with a real and authentic experience and explore nature and wildlife, is by taking the roads and camping in remote unfenced camping sites.

During 10 days, I had the opportunity to self-drive and to camp in the wild safari of Botswana at some of the best safaris in the world: Chobe National Park and Okavango Delta.

I was very excited about this incredible experience to visit the best safaris in Botswana, but I still had many questions if it was safe and if I had planned it well enough. I had a lot of “what if…” questions in my mind.

Even though a road trip in Botswana was the best travel idea I ever had, it was completely nerve-racking at the same time.

So before you get all excited and book that rental car, I have listed ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW, from the tips and tricks I learned the hard way and some things that I wish I knew before I went on what I call “the biggest adventure of my life”

Enjoy this Botswana Camping Safari guide, and safe travels!

Jump to:

BONUS RESOURCES:  In this Botswana Self-Drive Camping Safari guide, you can find all the best tips and practical information you need. In the end, you can find a bonus section for all the RESOURCES you need to plan and book your camping adventure in Botswana, and to make your experience as easy, safe, and fun as possible.

Botswana Wild Camping- PIN IT FOR LATER!

Botswana Safari & the Unique Tourism in Botswana

I would like to start sharing this very important information about traveling to Botswana!

Botswana has a very unique tourism industry, based on a sustainable tourism model. Botswana relies on a low volume / high revenue tourism strategy, and it serves as an example all over Africa and the Planet. In other words, it is not cheap to visit Botswana!

The business model in Botswana helps the local economy and assists with keeping balance in the fragile ecosystem by controlling the number of tourists. Higher prices help to support this sustainable system of tourism in Botswana.


INDEPENDENTLY: If you choose to travel independently to Botswana, keep in mind that the planning will take time and (a lot of) patience. It took me about 3 months of hard work to plan my itinerary in Botswana, especially, to be able to book all the campsites. Communication with Botswana is challenging and it may take days, or even weeks to answer back to you. Plus, consider that you will be driving in very remote and isolated areas. You will need to have some basic mechanical skills (changing tires), and expertise driving off-road (mud, deep sand, crossing water, etc.).


TAILOR-MADE TRIP: A popular alternative to visit Botswana is to hire an expert local company. They can incorporate any destination into your travels or even any animal species that you hope to see. You can create a bespoke itinerary, and design your ultimate safari to match your interest, budget, and travel dates. I highly recommend Wild Wonderful World, as they put together incredible itineraries, and part of the profits are used on amazing conservation efforts in Africa.

Got inspired to visit Botswana? I have great news for you! Readers of Paula Pins the Planet can get a very special price. Request it below to receive your PROMO CODE direct to your email.

Botswana self-drive safari at the campsite
Self-drive safari at Okavango Delta
safari in remote areas of Botswana
Botswana safari monkey

SECTION I
All you need to know about Self-Drive Safari in Botswana

1- PREPARE BEFORE YOU GO

I cannot emphasize enough how much preparation you need, especially if you decide to go on a self-drive safari and wild camping on your own.

In reality, my trip started 3 months in advance, when I planned my Botswana safari 10-day itinerary (visiting in low-season). I studied the maps, made reservations at the camping sites, and tried to make payments (I will share more details below). I did a lot of research online.

Also, I reached out to some local people with a lot of experience driving in Botswana in order to ask for professional help with my itinerary. I am sharing all my lessons learned here with you!

I recommend reading my 10-day Complete self-drive itinerary in Botswana, for all the detailed information you need to self-drive in Botswana, and my complete Botswana safari, from Chobe to Okavango and all between to choose the best safaris for you. 

Botswana camping safari

2 - YOU NEED A 4X4 WHEEL DRIVE CAR

This is a fact! You will need to have a 4×4 car, either if you decide to go with a tour operator, or if you decide to go on an adventure to self-drive safari in Botswana.

Driving in Botswana is very challenging. You will start to learn it during your preparation when it is hard to find information online, and some of the roads do not even show on the map.

In some National Parks, such as Chobe National Park and Moremi Game Reserve, you cannot even enter the park if you don’t have a 4×4 WD car.

The struggle is real, and the roads are really challenging with a mix of sandy and muddy roads, and even some points where you will need to cross the water (during the rainy season).

Wild safari and self-drive in Botswana
Self drive safari in Botswana

3 - CHOOSING A 4X4 VEHICLE TO SELF-DRIVE BOTSWANA

Now that you know you will need a 4X4 to self-drive in Botswana, what else you will need in your car?

If you choose to go wild camping in Botswana, you will need a fully equipped car with some basics for survival: Tent on top, cooking gear, refrigerator, and, because of the long-distance off-road driving, your vehicle will have to have at least 2 spare tires, 2 batteries, and an extra-large gas tank.

I recommend reading my full guide on How to go on a self-drive in Botswana wild safaris for additional tips on road conditions. 

I have great news for you! Paula Pins the Planet readers get a special offer for a 4×4 Car Rental in Namibia. Request your special price below, and I will send you an awesome Promo Code.

4x4 Self-drive Botswana

4 - YOU NEED OFF-ROAD DRIVING EXPERIENCE AND SOME MECHANICAL SKILLS

Great! You prepared for your trip, you rented a 4×4, and now? You will need great driving skills to be able to drive in Botswana, and I really mean it!

I do a lot of road trips around the world, but there is nothing like driving in Botswana. It is another level of “off-road” – the bumpy roads are no joke! You will also most likely get stuck, have to change a flat tire, and do some basic mechanical work during a trip like this.

5- BUY THE TOURIST MAP WHEN YOU ARRIVE IN BOTSWANA

This is the best map you can have if you are self-driving and camping in Botswana.

You can buy these maps at the Botswana wildlife office, including at the National Park gates, and also, at the campsite offices. I bought the Chobe and Moremi tourism map, and I was surprised by how complete and useful they are.

You can find not only the safari area map but also the coordinates, viewpoints, some main safari spots, and even the campsite layout.

Botswana camping sites

SECTION II
All you need to know about wild camping in Botswana

6 - CAN I CAMP IN THE OPEN WILD?

The answer is a NO NO!

You are only allowed to camp at the designed areas, the campsites. Pulling off the trail and setting up your tent is not allowed in Botswana.

All vehicles must be in the campsites before dark. To be clear, there are a limited number of campsites and a limited number of spots at those sights, and reservations are required. If you are caught open camping you may be mistaken for a poacher, receive a fine or worse put yourself and wildlife in an unsafe situation.

In order to enter the different sections of Chobe and Okavango, you have to pass through park gates. These gates are checkpoints that you must register your entry and exit.

In order to enter the gate, you MUST HAVE proof of reservation at a campsite and a permit or the CASH to pay for the permit (no credit cards – you are in the middle of the bush).

THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT: If you don’t do this you will not be allowed into the remote areas of the parks. Make your reservations with the campsites along your route early (they fill up quickly and there are not many) and make sure you pay for the daily permit in the park in local money.

Safari in Botswana in remote camping
Camping by the river was a great spot to share the area with hippos

7 - HOW TO CHOOSE THE CAMPING AT THE NATIONAL PARKS

Good question, right? First of all, you will need to decide on your detailed itinerary for your trip to Botswana and decide where you will spend the night.

Then you will need to contact the 2 companies that administer the campsites and make reservations well in advance.

The camping areas are very limited! I recommend reading my full guide on the Botswana Self-Drive – How to find and book the best wild campsites.

8 - WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO MAKE RESERVATIONS

Good luck with this one…sorry, I don’t want to disappoint you, but I need to be honest and say that this is the most challenging part of your trip.

Things in Botswana move much more slowly than I am used to. Getting a hold of someone or getting responses can take quite a bit of time.

If you are making plans from the Western Hemisphere, the time change also makes it challenging. Don’t be afraid to get on the phone and call the reservation companies.

The booking in Botswana is a very manual process, still, carbon copy receipt based rather than Internet bookings. See the section RESOURCES below for the great advice I have for you on how to book accommodations for wild camping in Botswana. And don’t forget, once you have the reservations, bring hard proof with you. You will not have internet access at the entry gates.

Savuti National Park in Botswana
Baobab tree at Savuti National Park

9 - CAMPING IS NOT FENCED IN THE NATIONAL PARKS IN BOTSWANA

Different than what I thought prior to camping in Botswana, the campsites in Botswana are not fenced.

That means the chance to have a wild animal encounter is really big!

At night you will listen to wildlife noises, and during the day or night, you may have some visitors. All you have to do is not panic, remain calm and most likely they are just looking for food or they are curious about you.

 

10 - WHAT TO EXPECT FROM THE CAMPING SITES IN BOTSWANA

The campsites in Botswana have only the basics for you to camp with your own tent.

They will have a designated camping site for you, which normally will have a tree that you can park your 4×4 under. Some camping sites have a faucet with water, a concrete table for you to cook, electric power until 10 PM in the ablutions, and a fire pit.

All the campsites have an ablution area with shared bathrooms and showers, and I found them all very clean.

What the heck are ablutions? Ablutions are buildings with toilets and shower rooms. Each campsite has one or more ablutions that everyone shares. Just remember, if the camp has power, it will go out at a certain time. This means the ablutions will be without lights throughout the night.

Wild camping site at Savuti in Botswana
Savuti Campsite has a elephant-proof ablution block since elephants used to reach out for water

11 - DON'T EXPECT TO HAVE ELECTRICITY AT THE CAMPSITES

Most of the campsites have no electricity, or if they have, they turn it off around 10 PM.

Remember that you are in the middle of a national park, and life is different! The sky has an infinity of stars, which will make you appreciate being in the dark.

Make sure you pack some headlamps and some flashlights and some additional batteries, this is all you need.

12 - NO COMMUNICATION: PHONE SERVICE AND WI-FI ARE A LUXURY IN BOTSWANA

I really spent 10 days without any communication in Botswana. It was both, scary and amazing at the same time.

Scary in case you really have no contact with anyone for many days, and amazing because you really focus all your time on the present moment. No opportunities to share that amazing selfie with an elephant on your Instagram.

When I finally was back in the civilization and had access to Wi-fi, I had messages from my family from Brazil saying that it was the last call for me to answer before they contact the consulate to try to locate me…ha! I am glad I got the last call, just on time.

Botswana safari with elephants
My typical selfie with an elephant in Botswana

13 - YOU WILL HAVE TO COOK IN THE OPEN AT THE CAMPSITE

Just be aware that if you are going wild camping in Botswana, the campsites do not have restaurants.

Consider yourself lucky when a campsite has a faucet with running water and a cooking table at your camping spot. They are very, very simple and basic.

Before you leave the town, make sure you stock up on food and I recommend having some extra cans of food (Yuck…I know, I also don’t like canned food, but they saved my life a few times during my trip to Botswana).

Wild camping in Botswana
Xakanaxa camping in Botswana

14 - DON'T GO TO THE BATHROOM IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT...WHAAAT!?

That is right! There is no such thing as going to the bathroom in the middle of the night while you are camping in Botswana.

I have read and heard terrible stories of people who decide to do it while wild camping in Botswana. One piece of advice that the locals gave me, and I want to pass along to you is DO NOT GET OUT OF YOUR TENT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT.

I had a terrible night when I was feeling very sick, and I had to wait until sunrise to be able to run to the bathroom, but I had to follow the rules.

I saw hyenas almost every night around my tent and I could hear lions being very active close by.

This was not scary, on the other hand, it was exhilarating looking out the tent and seeing them pass through the campsite. But don’t forget they are wild animals, and they are fully alert and ready to hunt in the dark of the night.

Wil camping in Botswana
Wild camping in Botswana safari

15 - FOLLOW THE BASIC RULES OF CAMPING IN BOTSWANA

I have been camping before, including in the jungle in Brazil before, but I learned that each location has its own rules, especially safety.

The campsites in Botswana are not highly supervised and sometimes we don’t even see anyone working at the sites, but make sure you follow at least the basics rules:

    • Camp only in DESIGNATED areas
    • Do not go to the bathroom in the middle of the night (yes, I know…I am repeating myself again here)
    • Clean your area after you cook, and don’t leave any food outside, as it will attract animals
    • Do not feed wild animals – this is dangerous for the animals and could result in them getting put down
    • Do not leave any belongings outside at night, hyenas love to grab your shoes and anything they can play with…or destroy! It happened to me
    • Clean your area before you leave, and take the trash to the designated area
Safari at Chobe in Botswana

SECTION III
All you need to know about a wild safari in Botswana

16 - LIKELY, BUT NO GUARANTEE TO SEE THE BIG FIVE DURING YOUR SAFARI IN BOTSWANA

It is true that Botswana is the land of the Big Five, but it doesn’t mean they are easy to spot.

After I have done a safari in Brazil, South Africa, and Namibia before, I was mentally prepared to see the big five in the safari paradise in Botswana.

But I cannot complain, I had the chance to see: Lions, African elephants, and buffalos – I didn’t spot any rhino or leopards during the 10 days of “hunting” with my Canon camera. I was not upset at all because I was still able to see from a very close distance the amazing wildlife in Botswana.

Botswana best camping is in Savuti
Lioness with her cubs at Savuti National Park
Savuti Camp self-drive
Savuti Camp sunset

17 - FEWER BUGS BUT MORE MOTHS THAN EXPECTED

When I camped in the jungle in Brazil, I ended up in the hospital because of mosquito bites. I was expecting the same in Botswana, but surprisingly I was wrong! There are much fewer mosquitoes than I expected and prepared for.

They do have malaria in Botswana, and I did take medication for prevention, but other than that, I rarely used the repellent I took with me.

On the other hand, my only struggle while camping in Botswana was the moths. I know…I know…they don’t cause any harm. But there are so many that to me, it was impossible to stay outdoors with my headlamp on. They fly aggressively in your face, they try to share your food with you and I also learned they love red wine.

18 - ANIMALS WILL MAKE YOU GO TO BED EARLY, AND ALSO GET UP EARLY

Welcome to the jungle baby! It is so exciting to be in the wild, sharing the same space with the natural inhabitants.

After sunset is when the wildlife is more active, especially for the hunters.

The nights in the wild campsites in Botswana are loud, and I learned that the most active animals in the dark are the lions, hyenas, and hippos – Yikes! “I will give you guys space to enjoy your nocturnal routine”.

My routine was to go to bed when the sun sets (around 8 PM) and get up when the first daylight started to show (around 4 AM). The birds are extremely happy (aka crazy loud) in the morning, and they will let you know it is time to wake up!

Safari at he Okavango Delta
Just another angry hippo at Okavango Delta

SECTION IV
What else should I know before I go wild camping in Botswana

19 - MIND YOUR BELONGINGS AT THE CAMPSITES

You never know when you will have an encounter at your campsite, the only thing you should know is that this will happen!

Beware of baboons, they can be very strong and intelligent, and they know how to open tents. Don’t leave food inside the tent, and collapse it when you go out.

Hyenas are very active at night, I was visited by hyenas almost every night. They are searching for food, so before you go to bed, pack everything. They will also steal your shoes, it happened to me! Be careful if you have small children, there are records of attacks at campsites at night.

Elephants can also visit you at the campsite in Botswana, and it also happened to me. My advice is just don’t panic, don’t run, and leave them alone.

Botswana safari
wilderness safari Botswana
Okvango Delta Safari

20 - YOU WILL HAVE ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS IF YOU ARE WILD CAMPING IN BOTSWANA

I had a couple of encounters at the campsite.

One day I was washing the dinner dishes at the Xakanaxa campsite when a huge hippo crossed in front of me! Another very close encounter was when I was cooking lunch at the Third Bridge campsite and a herd of elephants decided to go have some lunch too at my campsite. It was gorgeous to be so close to them.

I had a very close encounter with a hyena in the middle of the night. Lying in my tent I heard the noise outside, and there she was, spying on me, and the funniest thing? With one of my sneakers in her mouth, which decided to take with her when she ran out in the middle of the night. What did the hyena do with my sneakers? Even today I think about that scene and have fun just imagining it.

Just remain calm, don’t run or try to scare the animals, and never forget rule #1: Never leave your tent in the middle of the night.

You can read more about some amazing stories on epic Africa Safari animal encounters.

wild elephants at the camping site in Botswana
Camping in remote areas at the safari in Botswana

21 - BRING ENOUGH CASH WITH YOU

You must be asking “but there is nowhere to go shopping during a wild safari” – yep, you are right. But you still need to carry cash, why?

You may decide to do an activity while on safari (guided safari, boat safari, etc) or you may find a campsite that has a small concession stand (water, basic food).

Another reason you will need to carry cash is that you have to pay the National Park fees at the gate, and they only accept Pula (local currency) – in the park, there are options for credit cards.

22 - PACK YOUR FOOD LIKE YOU WOULD PACK YOUR EGGS

I wouldn’t understand this either if I haven’t seen what the bumpy roads can do to your gear.

On my way to Savuti, the “trails” were so crazy bumpy that I lost 1/3 of my food and water supplies. Containers of juice and water broke and mixed with a package of rice and the heat of the African summer cooked my rice in the trunk of my 4×4 – yes, it was a mess to clean, and yes, I ran out of food and water sooner than I expected.

Don’t underestimate how rough the trails are in the parks. Whatever you have in the back of your vehicle will move up and down with the bumps of the trails.

23 - HAVE ENOUGH WATER

Have enough water and read above in tip 22.

In Okavango Delta, I ran out of water sooner than I had planned and I had to boil water to drink. Yes, even after boiling, the water was still dark, so you don’t want to know how that water tastes, right?

Okavango Delta wild safari

24 - ALWAYS HAVE SOME CANS OF FOOD WITH YOU, THEY MAY SAVE YOUR LIFE

Read number tip 22 – Yes, I planned my food accordingly but because of the incident, I lost some food. Thankfully I had some cans of beans and vegetables, which saved some of my meals (and my life).

25 - WHEN TO GO CAMPING IN BOTSWANA

Regardless of the time of year, the wildlife and scenery in Botswana are incredible all year long.

But the best time to visit is during the dry season between May to October. At this time, the grass is lower, and the trees have less foliage, making it easier to spot hidden animals in the undergrowth. 

A shortage of water causes wildlife to congregate around permanent water holes, or to make a daily pilgrimage to the river.

I visited Botswana at the end of December but it was only possible to drive to some sandy roads because the rainy season this year came later.

Wild safari in Botswana
Safari and camping in remote areas of Botswana

26 - BOTSWANA IS A MALARIA AREA

I recommend consulting a doctor before you go to Botswana and see if you can get a prescription for malaria prevention medicine since there is no vaccine available. Don’t forget to pack your bug repellent.

27 - DON'T TRAVEL TO BOTSWANA WITHOUT TRAVEL INSURANCE

Please, do not take the risk to travel to Africa without travel insurance, stuff happens and travel insurance is absolutely essential for a Botswana self-drive safari

Considering that anything can go wrong with any trip, we don’t want to risk the fun, right? Risks are of breaking down, losing your luggage, or even worse,  having an accident and getting injured.

I recommend and also use reliable insurance through World Nomads. You can just do a quick quote below, and you will be surprised to find out how little it can cost, for the benefit you will get. 

28 - WHAT TO PACK FOR WILD CAMPING IN BOTSWANA

You want to pack light….but at the same time, you will be so remote for many days that you will want to pack heavy. So, let me help you PACK SMART! 

    • GPS and a good Botswana map. 
    • Extra flash lights and batteries 
    • A well-equipped First Aid kit (including a snake bite kit)
    • Rehydration solution
    • A day bakcpack
    • Satellite phone
    • Inflatable LED Solar Lantern. 
    • Bring a warm blanket for cold nights.
    • Camera and safari lens
    • Hat and sunglasses
    • Toilet paper
    • Sunscreen
    • Hand sanitizer
    • Emergency water supply

TRIP PLANING RESOURCES

PLANNING A TRIP TO BOTSWANA

If you are going to travel to Botswana, pre-planning, research, and understanding what you are looking for in a destination will help make your travels far more successful and safe. Here is some further information I think you might need to plan your self-drive safari in Botswana itinerary.

Visit my Botswana Travel Guide for more information about your trip to Botswana. 

Check my 10-Day Self-Drive Safari itinerary for all the day-by-day details about my trip to Botswana.

If you are planning to go wild camping, read about my experience Sleeping under the stars in Botswana to find out what to expect.

I have prepared a very complete guide of The best Safaris in Botswana and how to visit it. 

If you are combining your Botswana trip with Namibia, check my Namibia self-drive road trip Itinerary

ACCOMMODATIONS IN BOTSWANA

Keep in mind that booking wild campsites in Botswana is extremely challenging and requires lots of patience and persistence.

The campsites in Botswana are run by different private operators, The gates and reception have booking agents, but I strongly advise you to reserve your accommodation before your trip to Botswana, as the number of campsites is limited. You will be turned away if no space is available, and you will have a long trip back to the nearest town.

Things in Botswana move much more slowly than I am used to. The booking in Botswana is a very manual process, still, carbon copy receipt based rather than Internet bookings. I suggest visiting the Botswana safari guide for accommodation recommendations and options. 

If it doesn’t seem worth the trouble to you, you can always hire a third-party company to handle the booking for you – if you need any recommendation or have any questions, please leave a comment below and I will be happy to help.

If you are planning to stay at lodges, Booking.com  is the best option as it is a reliable source and they have a 24-hour cancellation policy that I have used several times.

Booking.com

AIRPORTS IN BOTSWANA

Botswana’s main airport is Sir Seretse Khama International Airport (GBE), located 11km/7miles north of Gaborone, the capital.

If you are flying from South Africa, you can take a direct flight from OR Tambo International Airport (JNB), Johannesburg, or Cape Town International Airport (CPT).

It is also common to fly into Maun Airport (MUB) and Kasana Airport (BBK). When combining a safari in Botswana with a visit to Victoria Falls, it is common to fly into Maun and depart from Victoria Falls Airport (VFA) in Zimbabwe or Livingstone Airport (LVI) in Zambia.

RENTING A CAR IN BOTSWANA

You will need to have a 4×4 vehicle to go on a self-drive safari in Botswana, either if you decide to go with a tour operator, or if you decide to go on an independent adventure.

If you are arriving in Botswana and starting your drive, I recommend renting a car with Rental Car, as they have access to cars from all the major companies which are compared on a grid format that clearly displays the prices from each provider. Click on the bottom below to get the best deals on rental cars in Botswana.

If you are driving from Namibia, readers of this blog have a great discount with Zambezi Car Rental.

I have great news for you! Paula Pins the Planet readers get a special offer for a 4×4 Car Rental in Namibia. Request your special price below, and I will send you an awesome Promo Code.

4x4 Self-drive Botswana

TRAVEL INSURANCE FOR YOUR TRIP TO BOTSWANA

Please, do not take the risk to travel to Africa without travel insurance, stuff happens and travel insurance is absolutely essential for a Botswana self-drive safari

Considering that anything can go wrong with any trip, we don’t want to risk the fun, right? Risks are of breaking down, losing your luggage, or even worse,  having an accident and getting injured.

I recommend and also use reliable insurance through World Nomads. You can just do a quick quote below, and you will be surprised to find out how little it can cost, for the benefit you will get. 

ADDITIONAL TIPS FOR YOUR TRIP TO BOTSWANA

    • Currency: The local currency in Botswana is Pula. They widely accepted South African Rand. You can use an ATM in one of the main towns. Always carry money with you, as most places do not accept credit cards.
    • Fuel: on long drives pick up fuel regularly in the major towns as there can be long distances between stations.
    • Supplies: snack and drinks are available at most of the fuel stops and the bigger towns had a well-stocked Spar Supermarket. 
    • Maps/GPS: Download maps onto your phone which can be accessed offline. Also, keep a paper map in the glove box just in case!
    • SIM cards: it’s easy to pick up a pay as you go SIM in the airports as well as local mobile network stores.
    • Internet: If you are planning to go on a mobile camp safari, note that you won’t have access to the internet. I spent 10 days in Botswana without internet access. 
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Hi, I am Paula

Marketer, Blogger & Athlete

I'm a Brazilian native who calls U.S. home.

Travel & be healthy is my philosophy for a happy life balance, and for this purpose, I embarked on a journey to inspire and empower others to seek new adventures and live an active and healthy lifestyle..

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20 thoughts on “Botswana: 28 things to know before you go on an independent Botswana Camping Safari

  1. PATRICIA MARTINELLI FERNANDES says:

    Matéria super completa, rica em detalhes, ajuda muito grande aos viajantes… pois não é tarefa fácil..rsrsrsrsrs…parabéns pela ajuda a todos que procuram por este tipo de artigo concentrado em um só lugar… evitando longas buscas por sites e blogs diversos. As fotos como sempre fantásticas.

  2. madhu sharma says:

    Those are some really interesting and useful tips for wild camping.someday I may want to be here. Thanks for sharing

  3. BELLA says:

    Great post and gorgeous photos! Botswana is absolutely top of my wish list so as soon as we’re allowed to travel again I will be back here to pick up ALL the tips!

  4. Emma says:

    OMG, wild camping, and self-driving must be an incredible experience. I took such an easy way when I visited Tanzania in a fully organized safari! Maybe next time I can be a little more adventurous. 🙂

  5. Sophie says:

    This sounds like such an incredible trip! I would absolutely love to go to Botswana and I hadn’t considered doing it as a self-drive wild camping trip, but now I definitely want to.

  6. Emma says:

    This sounds like the most phenomenal experience. So close to all the wildlife. I’m not really one for camping, and not being able to get out of the tent in the night would make me even more nervous but I guess it’s all about being smart and planning ahead

  7. Yara says:

    Such great tips to any type of wild camping honestly! Botswana has been on my life for quite a few years, and I cannot wait to get the opportunity to visit. Thank you for this inspo!

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